Nov 022015


My name is Ikumi Kawamata, a graduate student pursing towards my Masters in International Development and Public Administration at Gallaudet University.  I am requesting your participation in the online survey titled “The Effects of the Americans with Disabilities Act on Deaf and Hard of Hearing Employees in the DC/VA/MD Area”. Your participation and contribution can make a difference to increase the employment opportunities for Deaf and hard of hearing individuals in the future. This survey should take less than 15 minutes to complete. Most of the questions are multiple-choice, with three comment boxes at the end.


To participate in the survey, you must be

  • 18 years of age or older
  • employed in the DC/MD/VA area, and
  • Deaf, Hard of Hearing, or Deaf-plus.


Thank you in advance for your time and support!



Ikumi Kawamata



Address: 800 Florida Avenue NE #1740, Washington, DC 20002

Oct 202015

I am deaf, and have been since I was a child – and after asking hundreds of other deaf people about dumb things that have been said to them, I compiled a list based on the results:

10 Dumb Things Hearing People Commonly Say to Deaf People:


1. “You don’t look deaf!”

To see more:

Oct 152015

ORLANDO (CBSMiami) – Marine life experts at SeaWorld Orlando think they’ve discovered why a rough-toothed dolphin rescued on June 21st stranded itself on Clearwater Beach.

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Oct 152015

The Federal Communications Commission is backing development of a platform that it hopes will help make communicating easier for the deaf and hard of hearing. At a Thursday keynote for the Telecommunications for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (TDI) Conference, FCC chair Tom Wheeler announced a program he calls Accessible Communications for Everyone, or ACE. According to Wheeler’s presentation, ACE’s goal is to create a core set of apps that can link existing text and video services for hearing- or speech-impaired users, or connect those users directly to company or government offices’ American Sign Language support lines. And the platform itself will be open source, opening the door to more creative uses over time.

To read more:

Oct 092015


In an effort to further open the lines of communication for people with hearing and speech disabilities, a university student in London is developing a smart glove that converts sign language into text and spoken dialogue. Dubbed the SignLanguageGlove, the wearable device features a handful of sensors to convert hand and finger movements into words, with its creator now looking to add real-time language translation to the mix.

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